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4th Graders Gone Green

Meet KLO’s first paperless classroom! Karla Anderson’s 4th grade class has jumped into the paperless fray with digital notebooks for science and math. Ms. Anderson walked the class through setting up individualized math and science notebooks in the Notability app. Notability was chosen over other apps because of the following features:

  • Creation of separate, color-coded notebooks.
  • Ability to easily sync with student and teacher district Google doc accounts.
  • Ability to import PDFs and images and draw on top of them.

To share assignments with students, Ms. Anderson simply places a worksheet in a Google docs folder shared with all of her students. Students log into the Google Drive app on their iPads and open the worksheet right into Notability, where they can either type or draw their answers. When finished with the assignment, they “share” the worksheet back into their Google Drive so Ms. Anderson can review, comment and grade the work.

The app Book Creator has long been a favorite KLO app for students to create their own eBooks. Ms. Anderson has found an innovative use for it thanks to Tim Harkins (@mrtharkins), 2nd grade teacher at West Elementary School in Andover, MA, who presented his science eBook idea at the 2013 fall MassCUE Conference. Ms. Anderson has created eBook “texts” for each science curriculum unit. The eBooks are shared out with students via Google Drive. Each student then brings the ePub into Book Creator on their iPad and plug in their answers, photos and videos as the unit progresses. Each text also included pre and post assessments so that students and teacher could see the measure of student growth nested conveniently among the content.

We asked two students to share their experience using the eBook texts as well as to give a brief tutorial on how to use the Notability and Book Creator apps:

Ms. Anderson will then take you deep into her Google Drive process to demonstrate her paperless workflow:

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Three Interesting, Maybe Conflicting Ideas from Boston’s SXSWedu Meetup

WBUR’s Peter Balono-Rosen covers a SXSWedu Boston Community Meetup — which boasted over 30 participants, each with big ideas for education’s future they hope to share on stage at March 2015’s SXSWedu event in Austin, Texas. Read full article here: http://learninglab.wbur.org/2014/07/11/three-interesting-maybe-conflicting-ideas-from-bostons-sxswedu-meetup/

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Teaching Teachers to Code

Twenty junior kindergarten – 5th grade students from the Kennedy-Longfellow School (KLO) took on the challenge to teach teachers, and other community members, how to code at this year’s Lesley University Community of Scholar’s Day. The KLO/Lesley Technology Partnership team are in their third year teaching Scratch and other programming tools to students at the KLO Community Schools Afterschool Program.

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Using Tablets to Teach–Not Distract–In the Classroom

Industry analysts predict that schools will purchase 3.5 million tablets by year’s end. How is this changing the classroom? WGBH’s innovation reporter Cristina Quinn takes a look at a digital platform that is helping teachers gauge student learning on the fly. View article at: http://wgbhnews.org/post/using-tablets-teach-not-distract-classroom.