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Design Your World: Part of the Cambridge Science Fest

Families using Tinkercad software for 3D design.
The Lesley STEAM Learning Lab hosted two hands-on workshops on Friday, April 20th as part of the 2017 Cambridge Science Festival. The session activities invited parents and caregivers to tinker with their children and develop unique solutions for a host of design and engineering challenges.  Continue reading Design Your World: Part of the Cambridge Science Fest

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Makerspace Mashup – SXSWedu 2015

Anne Larkin, Jacy Edelman, Kreg Hanning & Sue Cusack
Lesley University
SXSWedu  Conference & Festival 2015

March 10, 2015

SXSW15_prezi

 

Kinetic Sculpture

Squishy Circuits

Kinetic Sculpture Simple Machine Project
Lesson Plan
Instructions
eBook Template
Lesson Plan

Scratch and Maps

Hickory Dickory Dock

Lesson Plan Lesson Plan
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Makerspace Mashup – Inspire 2014

Amanda Kilton, Kate Murphy, Kathy Malone & Karla Anderson
Kennedy-Longfellow Elementary School
Anne Larkin, Jacy Edelman, Kreg Hanning & Sue Cusack
Lesley University
The National Institute of Student-Centered Education (NISCE)

INSPIRE 2014 Conference website
Oct 23, 2014

Click an activity for more info
Kinetic Sculpture
Squishy Circuits
Scratch and Maps
Hickory Dickory Dock
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Makerspace Mashup – MassCUE 2014

MassCUE15_photo

Amanda Kilton, Kate Murphy, Kathy Malone & Karla Anderson
Kennedy-Longfellow Elementary School
Anne Larkin, Jacy Edelman, Kreg Hanning & Sue Cusack
Lesley University
Massachusetts Computer Using Educators (MassCUE) and the Massachusetts Association of School Superintendents October 22, 2014

 

Click an activity for more info
SquishyCircuits_MASSCUE
Kinetic Sculpture
Squishy Circuits
Scratch and Maps
Hickory Dickory Dock
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Digital Adventures (JK-2nd)

Each student started off creating a stop motion animation using the free web based program, JellyCam. Students have since used iPad apps such as Toontastic, PupetPals and Little Birdie Tales to create narrated digital stories and animations.

This spring, we’ve introduced Bee Bots, programmable mini bee robots, to learn basic computer programming. We’re following a STEM curriculum created by Judy Robinson Fried, which includes lessons exploring concepts in math, literacy, social studies and art. Students were introduced to the concept of programming, beginning with basic commands to move the Bee Bot (right, left, forward, back). Using a basic square number mat, students were tasked with making the Bee Bot move to different numbers. We then jumped into addition and subtraction problems using a straight number line mat, where groups would have to program the Bee Bot according to each problem. For example, if the equation was 2+3, the correct command entered on the Bee Bot would be: clear, forward, forward, pause, forward, forward, forward, go. The Bee Bot would move 2 steps, pause, and continue 3 more steps to land on 5, where it would beep happily at his destination!

BeeBots